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Queens Officials Want 75 Miles of City Streets to Be Used for Cyclists and Pedestrians Only

Social Distancing Downtown NYC (Twitter: NYC Mayor’s Office)

April 17, 2020 By Michael Dorgan

Several Queens officials are backing legislation that would ban vehicles on up to 75 miles of city streets to create space for pedestrians.

Council Members Costa Constantinides, Daniel Dromm and Peter Koo are supporting legislation that would block vehicles from certain roads so that the public can use them with enough space to safely socially distance from one another.

They said that there is currently a lack of outdoor open space available for the public to use for exercise and that the new measures are needed as a matter of urgency.

“Right now it’s impossible on many of our cramped streets, which both endangers those who must go outside and discourages others from getting fresh air, said Council Member Costa Constantinides.

The proposal is being introduced by Speaker Corey Johnson and Manhattan Council Member Carlina Rivera who said that the council can no longer wait on Mayor Bill de Blasio to act and instead wants to force the city into action.

“While we want to work collaboratively with the administration to open streets, this issue is so important and so urgent that we are taking legislative action to make it happen ourselves,” Johnson said in a statement Friday.

De Blasio said in a press briefing Friday he would look at the legislation but that he had several safety concerns including the danger of blocking roads that emergency vehicles might need to use. He also said he was not convinced the measures justified the use of law enforcement officers that would be needed to police the streets.

Mayor Bill de Blasio (Ed Reed/Mayoral Photography Office)

De Blasio piloted a similar program on March 27 but scrapped it 10 days later because he felt that police officers could be better used elsewhere.

However, Johnson said that other states and countries have successfully implemented similar measures and said he sees no reason why the program cannot be applied to New York City. Washington D.C., Austin, Cleveland and Denver, and several other cities have shut streets down for the use of social distancing purposes.

The proposal also has the backing of bicycle advocacy group Transportation Alternatives who said that council members are seeking to lead and not play catch-up as the crisis unfolds.

“We call on the City Council and the mayor to implement this plan without delay, and, over time, to expand the program to support the needs of all New Yorkers,” the group’s Communications Director Joe Cutrufo said Friday.

“Streets account for roughly 80 percent of New York City’s public space, and their ambitious open streets program will give 75 miles of streets back to people, their rightful owner, when New Yorkers desperately need them,” he said in a statement.

The legislation is set to be introduced at the Council’s April 22 Stated Meeting, according to Johnson.

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11 Comments

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Brittany K

You sound the horn to thank essential workers for risking their health and now you close upto 75 miles of our tax paid streets?? What kind of nuts are you guys Billy Costa and Corey? GIVE US HAZARD PAY AND STOP TAXING EVERYONES PAYCHECK

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Kim John

So these idiots running the city try to immobilize us residents to drive but then allow the people and bikers to congregate in public? How about opening the parks? We pay taxes for them, or spot taking tax dollars from essential workers and GIVE US HAZARD PAY NYC!

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Avery

Amen to you Kim, I 100% agree we should get our taxes back since the city decided to close the parks. All bikes should be banned for the duration of this crisis especially city bikes since it’s a “sharing program” and that is how the virus spreads. I vote NO taxes for ANY worker STILL working AND HAZARD PAY FOR ALL. Wake UP Bill Blasio and Corey Jonson were in a crisis!

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Juliet

So giving outdoor space to people and bikes and taking it from cars is a step to recovery? Last
I checked your car provides more safety than the outdoors. Nice job Billy Costa and Corey!

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Kenny

Stay home Stop the spread; Save Lives Flatten the curve on every highway sign. Now these nuts running the city want to open the streets for people to “STOP THE SPREAD” and “SAVE LIVES” Billy Blasio contradicts his very words. He’s a real dumb guy. That’s why only 750k people voted for him.

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Jason

Even during the time of a pandemic these morons are trying to ban cars. This is an awful idea and I absolutely agree with Mayor DeBlasio’s stance. Emergency vehicles need access to the roadways. People need access to the roadways to go to the store or deliver supplies to those who physically can’t leave the house due to susceptibility of catching COVID or weakened immune systems. What about FedEx, UPS, Amazon, etc? Traffic will increase so technically there will be less social distancing. Cops can’t be sitting around idling in their cars (which pollutes so your stupid idea actually has several adverse effects) to block these streets while real emergencies are occurring. Bikes and pedestrians already have all the space in the world since virtually nobody is outside. Besides, I’ve seen so many bikes run red lights and ride super recklessly since this whole thing started!

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Carl F

Wow what a smart idea, they’re trying to keep us immobilized. Typical New York idiots

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Gardens Watcher

This is one case that I have to agree with the Mayor. It’s not only EMS that needs access to all streets. There’s access issues for the police and fire departments, and for ConEd emergencies. What about the increased traffic for food deliveries like God’s Love We Deliver, and UPS, Fedex, Amazon, etc.? What about transportation access for the disabled and for sick patients, or for me when I’m delivering groceries by car for my homebound neighbors?

Public health and safety are paramount, and no other city is feeling the pain like NYC. To jeopardize that for the sake of exercise, or to make an equal comparison to other smaller cities is ludicrous. We need our police force to protect us, not babysit blocked-off streets.

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Pat Macnamara

I thought we were supposed to shelter in place and only go out for essentials like groceries and medicine. Let’s close down streets so first responders can’t get to those who may need aid and the hipsters can roam freely. Exercise at home-run up and down the stairs in your building, do pushups, but stay home.

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Hipster jokes? Is it 2006 already?

Pat Macnamaracist you’re supposed to blame your problems on millennials now.

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Claude

As a lifelong Democrat I am wondering were did it all go wrong for our party, What is wrong with these guys?

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