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Parents of School Children in Western Queens Less Likely to opt for ‘Remote Learning’

Sept. 23, 2020 By Allie Griffin

Parents with children in western Queens public schools are less likely to keep their kids at home to learn remotely than the rest of the city.

The percentage of students in western Queens school districts learning remotely is significantly lower than the rest of the city, according to the latest survey results from the New York City Department of Education (DOE).

The city’s public school students are automatically enrolled in a blended learning model in which they attend class in-person on some weekdays and learn remotely on other days. However, students can attend classes remotely five days a week instead if their parents request it.

Citywide, 46 percent of public school students are learning full time on a remote basis.

Two western Queens school districts, however, have numbers much lower for remote-only learning.

Just 39 percent of School District 24 students and 43 percent of School District 30 students are learning on a remote-only basis.

District 24 covers Corona, Glendale, Ridgewood, Elmhurst, Maspeth, Middle Village and most of Woodside–while District 30 covers Astoria, Jackson Heights, most of Sunnyside, East Elmhurst, Long Island City and more.

School Districts in NYC (Courtesy of the DOE)

Parents in other districts in Queens, however, are much more likely to opt for remote learning.

The percentage of Northeast Queens public school students who are learning online on a full-time basis is particularly high.

School District 26 — which covers Bayside, Little Neck and other communities near the Long Island border — has the highest percentage of remote students citywide at 60 percent.

Adjacent School District 25 that represents schools in Flushing and College Point wasn’t far behind — 55 percent of public school parents have chosen to have their children attend classes online.

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Leftnuts

Sending my kids to private school because the DOE can’t get their act together. Kids have the lowest possible chance of being infected and they’re being punished. Makes no sense! They’ve been in school all month following ridiculous protocols but they’re happy, and learning!

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lieutenantdandan

Principal of PS 119 Glendale
told us over a Zoom conference that about 600 students opted
for full remote at home learning
and about 690 opted for
hybrid mixed learning in our school.
Hybrid consists of a student
being in school just one day the first week of the cycle. One day in class for the second week,
and two days in class for the third week.
Then the cycle begins again.
so
it appears that learning will
be mostly done at home.

Thermometer checks for students will be done at home and parents will have to fill out
of form with the DOE/school
for every morning that the child
will be attending school.

No discussions on student
safety transportation for students who are not eligible for
yellow school bus service will be given a metro card as this has been the standard.

We are hearing stories of crime
and homelessness running rampant in our subways and
probable service cuts will happen due to money shortages.

Anyways, our DOE should be placing more focus on full remote learning since it appears that most of the time this is how
students are getting their education.

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NYC waste

Odd thing to track. Are they bad people now? NYC going broke. So they waste their money on finding a new group to divide into pieces and scorn.

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