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Long Island City Trader Joe’s Store Slated to Open Next Year: Report

Prime Building at 22-43 Jackson Ave. (Photo: Queens Post, December 2019)

July 9, 2020 By Allie Griffin

A Trader Joe’s store coming to Long Island City will not open until early next year, according to a new report.

The popular grocery chain will move into a mixed-use building currently being constructed at 22-43 Jackson Ave, as first reported by the Long Island City Post in December.

The store was originally expected to open late this year, but a new report by The Real Deal states that it will now open early 2021.

The grocery store will take up a 17,000 square-foot ground floor space of the 11 story, 70-unit building called the Prime Building, designed by SRA Architecture + Engineering and developed by Circle F.

The Long Island City store will be the second Trader Joe’s location in Queens, as there is one in Rego Park.

The California-based chain that has 500 stores across the U.S., has taken New York City by storm since it opened its first store in the Big Apple in 2006.

The company now has 13 locations in the boroughs, including in neighborhoods such as Union Square, Soho, Chelsea, Midtown East, Brooklyn Heights and the Upper West Side.

Trader Joe’s is known for its quality products at affordable prices. It sells its own label products instead of name brands at lower costs.

Rendering (Photo: Circle F Capital)

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Anonymous

Don’t tell Michael Gianaris he’ll want Trader Joe to walk away and KeyFood to take over the site and open up shop.

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