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Indoor Dining to Resume in New York City at 25 Percent Capacity on Valentine’s Day

Gov. Cuomo in Albany Jan. 29, 2021

Jan. 29, 2021 By Allie Griffin

Indoor dining will resume on Valentine’s Day at 25 percent capacity across the five boroughs, Governor Andrew Cuomo announced Friday.

Cuomo said he lifted the indoor dining ban — which began on Dec. 14 — based on the decline in the  COVID-19 positivity rate.

The citywide positivity rate dipped to 4.9 percent yesterday from 7.1 percent on Jan. 5, according to state numbers. The rate, based on projection models, is expected to drop further in coming weeks, Cuomo said.

The announcement is welcome news for restaurant owners who have lost significant revenue since the restriction was put in place.

Cold weather has hampered business for outdoor dining forcing many establishments to close for the winter season — if not for good.  Takeout and delivery has brought in modest business for most.

Elsewhere across the state, indoor dining has remained open despite the fact that most regions have had a higher COVID-19 positivity rate than New York City. Cuomo said the city’s high density called for greater restrictions.

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jenastoriat

This is crazy. The city’s own numbers put the pos rate at nearly 9%. The state uses the less reliable antigen tests, likely with many false positives. The NY Times rates NY as extremely high risk. Data patterns suggest undercounting of disease rates. More contagious, and possibly more deadly strains have just arrived. Have we learned nothing?! Just madness. Or politics.

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Pat Macnamara

We have learned that closing down indoor dining didn’t make a difference in containing the spread of the air borne virus. We can’t stay in bubbles and remain sheltered in place. What happened to the flu? Has it been eradicated? Or is everything COVID 19? We have learned that trusting elected officials resulted in thousands of deaths in senior centers, a dramatic rise in crime and unemployment with the tax base fleeing the city in droves. The vaccine rollout has been a farce with distribution based on ethnicity and income levels. We have learned that elected officials allowed violent protests to take place over the course of weeks while blaming the police. Countless restaurants and businesses have shuttered forever. It will take decades for the city to rebound. We have learned plenty. Shutting restaurants while allowing criminally insane to roam the subway system-a superspreader by nature-was a terrible decision. One not based in science but in theory. Elected officials dropped the ball

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Jimmy C

It was never about Covid. It is political. Ruin the nation’s economy by shutting down the major cities and make it easier for Biden to win. After January 20th, Cuomo immediately started to reopen the state. In fact this cretin openly lamented that the vaccine, which would save lives, came out under Trump. He cares nothing about lives, it’s all about politics for him (see the nursing home debacle and his “who cares” comment)

Furthermore, locking down NYC helps Cuomo, Diblasio, etc. to achieve their Socialist goals by ruining the economy and making people dependent on more government, ushering in Universal Basic Income (dangling carrot of the commie leftists).

Dependents on Universal Basic Income will have to tow the line and conform thought. If they don’t, then the cancel culture takes over. Failure to conform, they lose their UBI, are removed from social media, fired, unemployable and ostracized from the commie utopia cuomo, diblasio, Gianaris, AOC, Caban, etc. want.

This is the plan, and it is well underway as the sheep follow the pied piper to the slaughter.

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Larry Penner

What a great way to say “I love you” by taking your significant other to their favorite restaurant on Valentines Day and also celebrate the return of limited indoor dinning! In these difficult economic times as a result of COVID-19, it is especially important to patronize your neighborhood restaurants.

With limited indoor dining returning on February 14th, take out and catering will continue to be the major source of income for most restaurants. When ordering take out, why not tip as if you were dinning indoors? My wife and I don’t mind occasionally paying a little more to help our favorite restaurants survive. Don’t forget your cook and server. We try to tip 20 percent against the total bill including taxes. If it is an odd amount, we round up to the next dollar.
These people are our neighbors. Thousands have already had to permanently close their doors. The remaining restaurants are barely hanging on. Who knows how many more weeks or months will go by, before they can increase indoor dinning to 50% followed by another return to full 100% capacity?
There are over one hundred thousand NYC residents whose livelihood depends on restaurants that are still out of work. This includes bar tenders, waiters, bus boys, cooks and cashiers. Wholesale food sellers, distributors, delivers, linen suppliers are also at a loss. There are also construction contractors and their employees, who renovate or build new restaurants.
Our local entrepreneurs work long hours, pay taxes and provide local employment especially to students during the summer. If we don’t patronize our local restaurants, they don’t eat either.

Larry Penner

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