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Two Lizards’ Astoria Location Shut Down By Court Order, Manhattan Operation Still Open

Two Lizards (QueensPost)

Dec. 19, 2017 By Tara Law

The Astoria location of Mexican restaurant and bar Two Lizards has been shut down by court order.

The restaurant, located at 35-02 Ditmars Blvd, opened in 2015. It was known for classic Mexican food, frozen margaritas and guacamole made table side.

The location was returned to the landlord’s control by the City Marshall on Dec. 6. A sign is posted in the window declaring that it is available for lease.

The original Two Lizards restaurant, located at 1365 1st Ave in the Upper East Side, is still open.

The owners also opened a new location called Don Tequila Urban Cantina. The restaurant and bar opened at 83-38 Woodhaven Blvd in Glendale in November.

Court Order (QueensPost)

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Anonymous

They started out well but the quality of the food went down the drain. You can’t expect to sell crap food at those prices and wait for people to come back. The service? It sucked. Indifferent waitstaff that didn’t care about aside from the 20% tip. And who calls customers honey? It’s not a diner and you’really not a 55 year old waitress…

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Juan

Didn’t pay rent for months. Built up his profit by any means nessary and moved on to opening a new restaurant. I’m sure the owner will continue doing these practices to new locations creating new business entities and protecting his personal money grains through unethical practice such as not paying rent, vendors and not paying employees.

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Mickey Doodle

Good location. The business was no good. This area isn’t really built for Mexican food . I didn’t think it would last

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rog

The place looked busy! But the restaurant owner probably felt like they were not profiting enough. Check yelp. So instead of closing it months ago they decided to leave it open until they were forced to leave. How is that a corner curse? Sounds like theft to me from someone who knows how to work the system.

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young_man!

From the notice it looks like the tenant stopped paying rent and the landlord went to court, got a Marshall and legally took back possession of his/her property.

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callium

Well since “the location was returned to the landlord’s control by the City Marshall” one can conclude they were not paying rent and leaving their doors open to the public until the city stepped in and forced them to close. In other words, the restaurant made as much money as they could without abiding by the lease (paying rent) until the landlord took them to court and the city kicked them out. I heard this happen many times to landlords in Astoria unfortunately it is a common practice for some business and apartment renters.

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cetex

Places that do not properly cater to the surrounding longtime residents and families tend to close after the younger crowd finds a newer establishment to “critique.” I been to this place and IMO the food was mediocre and the place seemed to rely heavily on alcohol to make a profit. It was also very noisy and loud.

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Jim

Sorry, that is not true. This place just sucked from day one. Bad food and bad service.

The longtime residents don’t usually go out eating and drinking as mush as young professional people do. There are many “trendy” eating places that do well in Astoria.

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