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These Schools Will Host ‘Gifted’ Classrooms as NYC Expands Segregated Program

Chancellor David Banks takes questions from the press after giving a speech at Tweed Courthouse, the education department’s downtown Manhattan headquarters, laying out his vision for New York City Schools. Christina Veiga / Chalkbeat


This article was originally published by Chalkbeat New York on May 24
BY

The sites of new gifted classrooms were announced Tuesday, part of an expansion pushed by Mayor Eric Adams and Chancellor David Banks.

Officials are adding more than 1,000 seats, most of them as new programs that start in third grade. Until now, the most common entry point for “gifted” programs has been in kindergarten, a practice long criticized for testing and sorting 4-year-olds.

Parents can begin applying for spots on May 31. Virtual information sessions will take place on May 24, May 26, and June 1. Live interpretation will be provided in Arabic, Bangla, Chinese, French, Haitian Creole, Korean, Russian, Spanish, and Urdu. To register for a session, click here.

The city’s gifted programs have come under fire for being segregated, with Black and Latino students starkly underrepresented. The classrooms also enroll few students who have disabilities, who are learning English as a new language, or are in temporary housing.

Gifted programs have long been seen as a way to keep white and more affluent families enrolled in public schools. In New York City, they have also been fiercely guarded by Asian families who see gifted programs as a ticket to higher performing schools. White and Asian students have historically made up about 70 percent of enrollment in gifted programs while only representing about a third of the school population citywide.

Former Mayor Bill de Blasio had proposed overhauling the programs, ending the current model where students labeled as “gifted” are served in their own, separate classrooms and schools — an approach that fewer than 10 percent of school districts across the country follow. But de Blasio announced the reforms at the end of his tenure, and they were never implemented.

Instead, Adams and Banks have doubled-down on the current model that keeps students in segregated classrooms, opting to add more seats.

The city is also changing how students are admitted, partly in an attempt to enroll a more representative group of students. Now, kindergarteners will be recommended for the program by their pre-K teachers. In third grade, admission will be offered to the top 10 percent of students based on their grades in core subjects.

Some parent leaders remain skeptical that the new approach will result in much change. Some of the city’s existing third-grade programs are currently under-enrolled, with families in those districts not wanting to send their children to a new school after second grade. Additionally, some families and educators worry about a potential domino effect the new programs may have on drawing students away from other schools that are already suffering from enrollment declines.

Here are the schools that will host a gifted program in the 2022-23 school year, according to information provided by the New York City education department. An asterisk indicates a program that is new.

Programs that start in kindergarten:

  • 01M015 – P.S. 015 Roberto Clemente
  • 01M110 – P.S. 110 Florence Nightingale
  • 01M539 – New Explorations into Science, Technology and Math
  • 02M011 – P.S. 011 William T. Harris
  • 02M003 – P.S. 033 Chelsea Prep
  • 02M077 – P.S. 77 Lower Lab School
  • 02M111 – P.S. 111 Adolph S. Ochs
  • 02M124 – P.S. 125 Yung Wing
  • 02M130 – P.S. 130 Hernando De Soto
  • 02M198 – P.S. 198 Isador E. Ida Straus
  • 02M217 – P.S./I.S. 217 Roosevelt Island
  • 03M165 – P.S. 165 Robert E. Simon
  • 03M166 – P.S. 166 The Richard Rodgers School of The Arts and Technology
  • 03M334 – The Anderson School
  • 04M012 – Tag Young Scholars (city-wide)
  • 04M102 – P.S. 102 Jacques Cartier
  • 05M128 – P.S. 129 John H. Finley
  • 05M175 – P.S. 175 Henry H Garnet*
  • 06M153 – P.S. 153 Adam Clayton Powell
  • 07X49 – P.S. 049 Willis Avenue*
  • 08X072 – P.S. 072 Dr. William Dorney
  • 09X199 – P.S. 199X – The Shakespeare School
  • 10X007 – Milton Fein School
  • 10X024 – P.S. 024 Spuyten Duyvil
  • 11X121 – P.S. 121 Throop
  • 11X153 – P.S. 153 Helen Keller
  • 12X458 – Samara Community School*
  • 13K056 – P.S. 056 Lewis H. Latimer
  • 13K282 – P.S. 282 Park Slope
  • 14K132 – P.S. 132 The Conselyea School
  • 15K032 – P.S. 032 Samuel Mills Sprole
  • 15K038 – P.S. 038 The Pacific
  • 16K081 – P.S. 081 Thaddeus Stevens*
  • 16K243 – P.S. 243K- The Weeksville School*
  • 17K316 – P.S. 316 Elijah Stroud
  • 18K115 – P.S. 115 Daniel Mucatel School
  • 19K149 – P.S. 149 Danny Kaye
  • 20K102 – P.S. 102 The Bayview
  • 20K104 – P.S./I.S. 104 The Fort Hamilton School
  • 20K164 – P.S. 164 Caesar Rodney
  • 20K200 – P.S. 200 Benson School
  • 20K205 – P.S. 205 Clarion
  • 20K229 – P.S. 229 Dyker
  • 20K686 – Brooklyn School of Inquiry
  • 21K095 – P.S. 095 The Gravesend
  • 21K099 – P.S. 099 Isaac Asimov
  • 21K215 – P.S. 215 Morris H. Weiss
  • 22K052 – P.S. 052 Sheepshead Bay
  • 22K193 – P.S. 193 Gil Hodges
  • 22K195 – P.S. 195 Manhattan Beach
  • 22K197 – P.S. 197 – The Kings Highway Academy
  • 22K236 – P.S. 236 Mill Basin
  • 23K137 – P.S./I.S. 137 Rachel Jean Mitchell*
  • 24Q119 – P.S./I.S. 119 The Glendale
  • 24Q153 – P.S. 153 Maspeth Elem
  • 24Q229 – P.S. 229 Emanuel Kaplan
  • 24Q290 – A.C.E. Academy for Scholars at the Geraldine Ferra
  • 25Q021 – P.S. 021 Edward Hart
  • 25Q032 – P.S. 032 State Street
  • 25Q079 – P.S. 079 Francis Lewis
  • 25Q165 – P.S. 165 Edith K. Bergtraum
  • 25Q209 – P.S. 209 Clearview Gardens
  • 26Q115 – The James J. Ambrose School
  • 26Q133 – P.S. 133 Queens
  • 26Q188 – P.S. 188 Kingsbury
  • 26Q203 – P.S. 203 Oakland Gardens
  • 27Q108 – P.S. 108 Captain Vincent G. Fowler
  • 27Q042 – P.S./M.S. 042 R. Vernam*
  • 28Q121 – P.S. 121 Queens
  • 28Q174 – P.S. 174 William Sidney Mount
  • 28Q220 – P.S. 220 Edward Mandel
  • 29Q176 – P.S. 176 Cambria Heights
  • 29Q118 – P.S. 118 Lorraine Hansberry*
  • 30Q085 – P.S. 085 Judge Charles Vallone
  • 30Q122 – P.S. 122 Mamie Fay
  • 30Q150 – P.S. 150 Queens
  • 30Q166 – P.S. 166 Henry Gradstein
  • 30Q300 – The 30th Avenue School (G&T Citywide)
  • 31R003 – P.S. 003 The Margaret Gioiosa School
  • 31R008 – P.S. 8 Shirlee Solomon
  • 31R042 – P.S. 042 Eltingville
  • 31R045 – P.S. 045 John Tyler
  • 31R050 – P.S. 050 Frank Hankinson
  • 31R053 – The Barbara Esselborn School
  • 32K376 – P.S. 376

Programs that start in third grade:

  • 01M034 – District 1: P.S. 034 Franklin D. Roosevelt*
  • 02M126 – P.S. 126 Jacob August Riis*
  • 03M191 – The Riverside School for Makers and Artists
  • 04M083 – P.S. 083 Luis Munoz Rivera*
  • 05M161 – P.S. 161 Pedro Albizu Campo*
  • 06M028 – P.S. 028 Wright Brothers*
  • 07X043 – P.S. 043 Jonas Bronck*
  • 07X359 – Concourse Village Elementary School
  • 08X075 – P.S. 75 School of Research and Discovery*
  • 09X204 – P.S. 204 Morris Heights
  • 10X340 – P.S. 340*
  • 11X106 – P.S. 106 Parkchester*
  • 12X314 – Fairmont Neighborhood School*
  • 12X214 – P.S. 214
  • 13K287 – P.S. 287 Bailey K. Ashford*
  • 14K084 – P.S. 084 Jose De Diego*
  • 15K024 – P.S. 024*
  • 16K021 – P.S. 021 Crispus Attucks*
  • 17K289 – P.S. 289 George V. Brower*
  • 17K241 – P.S. 241 Emma L. Johnston*
  • 18K235 – P.S. 235 Janice Marie Knight School*
  • 19K065 – P.S. 065*
  • 19K346 – P.S. 346 Abe Stark*
  • 20K127 – P.S. 127 Mckinley Park*
  • 21K188 – P.S. 188 Michael E. Berdy*
  • 22K203 – P.S. 203 Floyd Bennett School*
  • 22K361 – P.S. 361 East Flatbush Early Childhood School*
  • 23K599 – Brooklyn Landmark Elementary School
  • 23K446 – Riverdale Avenue Community School*
  • 24Q088 – P.S. 088 Seneca*
  • 24Q007 – P.S. 007 Louis F. Simeone*
  • 24Q087 – P.S./I.S. 087 Middle Village*
  • 25Q024 – P.S. 024 Andrew Jackson*
  • 26Q376 – P.S. 376*
  • 27Q056 – P.S. 056 Harry Eichler*
  • 27Q183 – P.S. 183 Dr. Richard R. Green*
  • 28Q086 – P.S. Q086*
  • 28Q140 – P.S. 140 Edward K Ellington*
  • 29Q251 – P.S. 251 Queens
  • 30Q092 – P.S. 092 Harry T. Stewart Sr.*
  • 30Q151 – P.S. 151 Mary D. Carter*
  • 30Q171 – P.S. 171 Peter G. Van Alst*
  • 31R022 – P.S. 022 Graniteville*
  • 32K274 – P.S. 274 Kosciusko*

Christina Veiga is a reporter covering New York City schools with a focus on school diversity and preschool. Contact Christina at cveiga@chalkbeat.org.

Chalkbeat is a nonprofit news site covering educational change in public schools.

email the author: news@queenspost.com

3 Comments

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CG

My wife grew up in a very low-income family in a very low-income neighborhood and attended one of the lowest ranked schools in the state. She describes her admission into the Gifted Program in the 90s as a life-changing event. Up to that point, school was a miserable experience where she was tormented by other neighborhood kids and got nothing out of her time at school.

The Gifted and Talented program is a lifeline for many kids. The solution to the problem of its lopsided demographics is not to kill the program, it’s to figure out how to find and help the kids who are being overlooked. It costs the city very little compared to other programs and has very solid outcomes. Expand it, adjust admissions to find more kids who would benefit from it, and establish other programs that will address inequalities. But let’s not throw out the baby with the bath water.

Reply
Vaughn Robinson

Excellence should be encouraged. I do not see anything wrong with gifted programs. The opportunity is available to everyone. The fact that people do not want to admit is that were are not all equal. Some are smarter, more ambitious, etc. I am not Bill Gates, but I am glad there was a Bill Gates and I am able to read this article and type this comment. The gifted children should be able to excel. If you want you child to get into these programs, spend the time, money, and effort to encourage them to pursue their goals and interests. Do not tear down “gifted” programs because not every child can qualify. Why cannot choose diversity in some areas and demand equity in others. Let those that can and chose excel, and that cannot or do not chose live their life.

Reply
Smh

Honest and refined comment, Mr. Robinson. Education and success starts at home. People seem to forget this.

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