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Seafood Restaurant that Offers Cajun Fried Catfish and African-American Cooking Opens in Astoria

Nov. 28, 2017 By Tara Law

A combined restaurant and fish market that aims to take on an African American and Caribbean flavor opened in Astoria Saturday.

Something Catchy, located at 23-14 36th Avenue offers items such as Cajun Fried Catfish, Whiting Fish, Lobster Rolls as well as fried shrimp and crabs legs. The fish market sells fresh fish, and also boils, steams and bakes to order.

The eatery is divided into a 16-seat restaurant and a fish market.

Kyle Alston, who owns the business with partner Davon Davis, said that he wants to serve fish that represents African American traditions.

Alston grew up in Ravenswood Houses, and now lives in Jamaica.

Alston said that while Astoria is diverse there are few restaurants that represent African American culture.

“For us to get stuff, you had to go to Harlem or Brooklyn,” Alston said. “We don’t have seafood that caters to our culture.”

The chef, known as “Mr.Takeout,” is experienced in cooking soul food, Alston said. He owns a restaurant named Mr.Takeout that focuses on soul food in Jamaica.

Something Catchy is open Sundays from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., Tuesday to Thursday from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 2 a.m, and closed Mondays.

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15 Comments

The yellow girl

LOVE THIS !! Everything about it ! SUPPORT OUR PEOPLE, SUPPORT BLACK BUSINESSES, we all we got yall




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SHAQUANDA MANDINGO WHATTSON JONES

right next to a check cashing place , great location choice . i sho hopes dey takes my ebt card .




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Shootouts

Be grateful and support. We got a fried fish spot in Ravenswood. You cant find that anywhere in nyc!




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your neighbor

Menu looks good but I wish it would indicate what special ingredients or cooking style make something like grilled flounder or a lobster roll African American.




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Harry Ballsagna

Do you wonder that about menu item variations at all restaurants, or only black owned establishments?

For example, have you ever thought about the Thirsty Koala menu and wondered what special ingredients make their Fried Calamari or Grilled Halloumi cheese or Fried Chicken with mashed potatoes “Australian influenced?”




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your neighbor

Nice work playing the race card Harry.
Menu looks like the menu of dozens of restaurants in Queens. I’d just like to know what differentiates it from other restaurants offering similar menu items.
I have an idea of what the style is going to be when I order seafood dishes at an asian or italian place but I don’t know what makes african american seafood different and the menu doesn’t give me any clues (other than thai/jerk/bbq sauces which I can get at a thai/caribbean/bbq place).

Maybe they are just targeting the people of ravenswood, but if they want people from outside of ravenswood (and I’m only about 10 blocks away) at least give us a hint.

I wish them success but I think the text/layout of their menu could use some work which is probably something very inexpensive to do in the context of the huge expense of opening a new restaurant.

I never heard of the Thirsty Koala, but googling their menu I see that they give a pretty complete description of lots of their meals.




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Harry Ballsagana

your neighbor is terrified at the thought of walking 10 blocks to dine at a restaurant across the street from Ravenswood.




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SoulLobstaMac&Cheese

I think that he is just wondering how things like truffle lobster mac and cheese or fra diavolo are remotely African American or soul food. But if you want to make it a race thing go for it




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