You are reading

Peaceful Protest Against Police Brutality Took Place in Astoria Tuesday

Protesters in Astoria take a knee Tuesday (Photo by: @JLa_NYC via Twitter)

June 3, 2020 By Michael Dorgan

A peaceful demonstration took place in Astoria Tuesday as protesters lamented the killing of George Floyd.

Hundreds of people gathered at the intersection of Steinway Street and 30th Avenue at around 1 p.m. to protest Floyd’s death that occurred at the hands of a Minneapolis police officer more than a week earlier.

The protest went off without incident, much like a similar demonstration at Astoria Park Monday evening.

Demonstrators on Tuesday held signs that read “racism is the pandemic,” “black lives matter” and “why are you so afraid of peace?”

They chanted Floyd’s name and that of Breonna Taylor – a black woman who was shot eight times by police officers in Kentucky earlier this year.

There was a visible police force present at the pre-planned event. However, there were no reports of violence or arrests made.

Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez was also seen at the protest handing out COVID-19 protection masks.

The demonstrators– at one poignant moment during the protest–knelt, raised their right hand in the air and stayed silent for almost nine minutes.

The moment of silence represented the length of time Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin kneeled on Floyd’s neck. Floyd was pronounced dead soon after the incident and Chauvin has been charged with Floyd’s murder.

The demonstrators marched on foot northward along Steinway Street, chanting, “no justice, no peace.” Several vehicles passed in the opposite direction to the protestors and honked their horns in support.

The crowd marched over to Astoria Boulevard and came to a stop outside the 114th Precinct, which is located at the intersection of 35th Street and Astoria Boulevard..

They were met by police in riot gear who were lined up outside the precinct. The protesters paused, held their hands in the air and chanted “don’t shoot, don’t shoot.”

The crowd then dispersed without any violent engagements with the police.

email the author: [email protected]

15 Comments

Click for Comments 
JM

Since protests are allowed. Small businesses can open up. If not, our government is discriminating against them and there should be lawsuits. For me, I will go on with my life as normal and will not abide by these discriminatory stay at home orders. I’m already going to work and gym as normal, and I hope more locals will find ways to secretly open and make income while our mayor and governor begs Washington for bailouts.

8
12
Reply
Mary

Ok. Duly noted. Everyone here, please be aware that JM will no longer be discriminated against .

19
12
Reply
Athina

Thank you for the racist comment in response to a protest raising awareness of systemic racism . It really helped drive the point home .

19
5
Reply
Pam

This reminds me of the Sandy Hook shooting when that white guy killed 28 kids , or the other shooting in Vegas when that white guy killed over 50 people or the Charleston church shooting when that other white guy killed 9 people or that white nazi who drove his car into 19 people . But yeah , i see what you mean .

15
6
Reply
Hillside & Sutphin

This also reminds me of the DC sniper, or the Virginia Beach shooter, or the Washington Navy Yard shooter, or the Milwaukee Coors shooter or 4th of July weekend in Chicago. But yeah, I see what you mean.

6
1
Reply
Sandy

I am a black woman and work in the school system in Queens. What did you mean by this?

10
4
Reply
Good point, almost all mass shooters are white

But this was a totally peaceful protest.

Thank you for agreeing that stereotypes are bad.

8
5
Reply
Bill

“MY” tax dollars?
“MY” roads?

You, sir or madam, are not part of the problem. You ARE the problem!

15
15
Reply
Anon

Why didn’t you do your “peace protest” VIRTUALLY like we the rest of the WORLD🌎 was FORCE to and still doing!?!?!

Oh an in a normal world you have MORE parades then our religious ones!😇O;P

Reply

Leave a Comment
Reply to this Comment

All comments are subject to moderation before being posted.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Recent News

Op-Ed: This Year’s State Budget Must Prioritize Climate, Jobs, and Justice for New York

Op-Ed, Jan. 30, By Assemblymember Jessica González-Rojas

In a time of rampant economic inequality and environmental injustice, it is easy to feel defeated.  Here in Queens and across New York State, however, communities are organizing for a better future. New Yorkers from different backgrounds and with different lived experiences are proving that we can build community, organize, and create a future that reflects our shared values.