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New Affordable Housing Lottery in Astoria, Rent Starts at $1,200

20-52 49th St. (GMaps: Photo January 2018)

July 30, 2019 By Max Murray

Two units are up for grabs in another Astoria affordable housing lottery — with the monthly rents going for $1,200 and $1,450 respectively.

The apartments are contained within a newly-constructed 3-story, six-unit building at 20-52 49th St., between 20th and 21st Avenues.

The two units differ in pricing with the one-bedroom unit costing $1,200 per month and the two-bedroom priced at $1,450 per month.

The one-bedroom unit is available for one or two occupants. With one occupant, the resident must have an annual household income of $41,143 – $89,640 to be eligible. With two occupants, the combined income must be between $41,143 – $102,480.

The two-bedroom unit is available for two to four occupants. The minimum annual household income permitted is $49,715. The maximum for two occupants is $102,480; for three people it is $115,230; and four people it is $128,040.

The building is close to the Q19, Q100, and Q101 bus stops as well as the N, W, and M trains.

Tenants will be responsible for paying gas, gas heat, and electricity.

The deadline to apply for the lottery is Aug. 13. While the apartments will be awarded to eligible applicants on a lottery basis, some preference will be given to those with mobility, vision or hearing disabilities.

To apply, click here

email the author: news@queenspost.com

29 Comments

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Francis J Van Wormer

What about a single 52 year old, that makes what $38,000 a year maybe 44000 that full time how do I get a place how do I live alone with no relatives no extra income work myself to death two jobs, isn’t that the whole point of portable living for people that make under the average either $20 an hour or $16 an hour or 36000 to $42,000 a year I don’t understand it, people making 60 70 80 thousand dollars a year can afford more especially if there’s more than one income coming in the house it’s ridiculous this way they do these things it’s for less fortunate people I can’t afford to live with disabilities poverty lower middle-class people that struggle single mom single dads single people in general like myself. I don’t even need much me smaller is better I can live in 350 sq ft hot shower a kitchen and a living room, decent bed all connected one small 300 foot apartment!

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Jon

You can’t get a $400 a month one bedroom even the smallest towns in America these days. That’s delusional.

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Richard

Dead Zone Area
Buses yes …
Subway ?
… a major hike.
Quiet block.
Nice walk to any
form of Civilization
other than other houses.
Not many trees.
… fire hydrant in
front is the nicest
amenity I could see.

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Rita

Its a short walk to the subway. I walk it daily. A supermarket and more is on 43 rd street and Ditmars. Many folks live in the area and do just fine. There is a lovely new playground a block away. Its a nice neighborhood and it reminds me of old Astoria where neighbors know each other and keep the neighborhood clean and safe.

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NoToLandlordClass

I’ve got one. Tie affordability to the applicants actual income to receive a tax break. Straight lottery.

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Amy

TWO units. Thousands of people apply and have to turn in all kinds of paperwork and take time off from work to go in for interviews, etc… for TWO units. Something has to be done about “affordable housing”. (End rant.)

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Melisa

This is part of AOC’s district as is the Ditmars area. So many of her supporters are moving into that area. I think more affordable housing will one day spread to 20th Ave. (where the old factories are).

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Jon

The old factories are a prime location for more housing.
That area is an dump and needs to go.

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kb

well..a 2 bedroom accepts an income of $49, 715 and will accept 3-4 people so that is quite good…13,000 per year for each.

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GP

Being a single mom of 3 that income is still too high. They should think about those possibilities and not assume all 3 or 4 occupants will bring in income.

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J

Maybe don’t have 3 kids in a super expensive city? I know it sounds harsh, but there are consequences for our choices.

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Lk

I understand that in this climate, today, it’s hard to stretch a dollar, but what about the people that live on less than the minimum in the article. This is not directed towards your publication, but to those out there creating these new structures and the city. Imagine living in these neighborhoods knowing you’ll never be able to afford to live in these new homes. That the fear you might not even be able to afford to stay where you are!? What about these people? What these new structures in this neighborhood and others are meaning to those people that have survived and thrived in neighborhoods where they’re being squeezed out by overpriced real estate!? Shame on the city for not addressing this problem!! What does it say about real estate if people making a very decent incomes are crying for affordable housing…think about that!? Shameful…

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JV

Maybe you should develop your own housing initiatives and present them to the city rather than cry online and complain ?

Just a thought ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

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Flushing Skeptic

How many people are capable of “presenting their own housing initiatives to the city?” I think this is a very legitimate argument for people being forced out or not being able to meet the requirements to rent one of these houses.

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kelly

Oh that’s so “kind” of you. Easy to say….. I feel for these people who work hard, and or have 2 jobs and still can’t afford a decent place to live. Maybe someday you’ll be out of a job and can’t afford to pay your rent or mortgage and you will be on the streets yourself… Karma…

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Paul Kersey

Why don’t you seek economic opportunities elsewhere then? If you are making a pittance here in NYC, why not go to a cheaper city and still make a pittance? At least your below poverty line income won’t be stretched as thin. No one is forcing you to remain in NYC-although this town does cater well to freeloaders…

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Roger

The city developed of thousands each year for the lower income tiers you describe. Perhaps not on 49th St in Astoria but that’s likely due to market forces (land prices) more than lack of city initiative.

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Jon

The incomes requirements are on there so that the people moving in can afford to pay and so that people making a lot more money don’t take all the spots. People at the bottom qualify for section 8.

The best way to address the problem is to build more housing, but no one wants a skyscraper in queens so it never happens.

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