You are reading

Neighborhood strip club with a history of violence to close, other strip joints in Western Queens may face similar fate

Aces, at 32-10 37th Ave. in LIC, announced it was closing down on Sept. 15 (Google Maps image)

Sept. 18, 2017 By Nathaly Pesantez

As a Long Island City strip club that was a magnet for crime announced this weekend that it was closing, community leaders are saying that similar clubs in Western Queens may end up seeing similar fates, too.

Aces, the gentlemen’s club located at 32-10 37th Ave., announced last week that it was shutting down via a post on Instagram. “The Aces family would like to thank everyone…for one hell of a run,” the club’s post reads. “There will never be another Aces New York.” Later posts also signal that the club would be reluctantly shutting its doors.

Several violent incidents took place at the club over the years–from shootings to assaults–and the police were often called to the troubled venue. A May 2016 incident saw a gang-related shooting outside of the club; that same year, more than 250 “911” calls were made that were associated with the club.

State Sen. Mike Gianaris (D-Astoria), who had long called for the club to close and was outraged when the State Liquor Authority (SLA) reinstated Aces’ liquor license earlier this year, celebrated the strip joint’s closing after the SLA ultimately canceled its liquor license on Sept. 12.

“It is a success for our neighborhood to get this source of community unrest shut down, but we must remain vigilant,” Gianaris said in a statement.

The owner of Aces could not to be reached for comment.

But Aces’ closing, coupled with the site of the former troubled Club Purlieu in Astoria turning into a retail locale after its closure last year, could signal the demise of other problematic strip joints in Western Queens.

Antonio Meloni, head of the Public Safety for Community Board 1, said that the SLA is finally listening and taking note of the public’s opposition to these clubs.

“When it’s a troublesome location, it’s very good that the SLA is paying attention,” he said. “We have found that the SLA is more responsive.”

At nearby Community Board 2 where strip clubs have also been an ongoing issue, Patrick O’Brien, the chairperson for the Public Safety committee, says Aces’ closing is “a very good sign”, and hopes that the recent events mean a crackdown on similar problem sites.

“I don’t think any community wants these kinds of establishments in their midst,” O’Brien said, adding that gentlemen’s clubs, while allowed to operate as long as they’re within the law, almost always bring problems to a neighborhood. O’Brien referred to Show Palace, the strip club on 21st Street in Long Island City, that has operated without a liquor license since its opening, but still sees periodic incidents.

“When you have a residential and vibrant upcoming commercial community, it’s only a matter of letting out enough rope [for strip clubs] to hang themselves because this activity almost universally seems to follow.”

“When they overstep the boundaries of what is safe and appropriate, they are writing their own epitaphs,” he added.

Nevertheless, O’Brien does not think strip clubs will ever be eliminated from the district despite the apparent clampdown.

“You can compel them to be in line, and this is a sign of exactly that—if you don’t operate in an appropriate manner, you’re going to lose your business.”

 

email the author: news@queenspost.com

15 Comments

Click for Comments 
Anonymous

Which is why another Aces New York hasn’t been made and probably never will be. Thank the council for that one. In fact, the girls that work there will go to other clubs and start their own businesses better than what Aces could have been…

Reply
Hip hop ray

Damn. I used to love aces. It was great seeing woman , getting drunk, and then sweating out all the alcohol running home and ducking bullets, out running muggers was the best yo!

Reply
your neighbor

It used to be difficult to rent out these one story warehouse buildings and the owners would take anybody who could provide stable income to cover their mortgage and real estate taxes.

Today, the properties are more valuable as residential, office or even retail conversions and that is the reason that these clubs will slowly disappear from our neighborhood. The clubs will move on to other neighborhoods – good riddance.

Reply
liz

The Astoria community had issues with these places for years but no one listened. I am sure developers have a big say in their closings today. No one is going to pay high rent or purchase expensive condos when you can google a location and see your living around the block from a strip joint.

Reply

Leave a Comment
Reply to this Comment

All comments are subject to moderation before being posted.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Recent News

Southeast Queens man arraigned on weapons charges after cops search his ‘ghost car’ near LaGuardia Airport: DA

A Hollis man was criminally charged after police discovered a cache of weapons in his vehicle during a traffic stop. He was pulled over for driving a “ghost car” with obscured license plates in East Elmhurst near LaGuardia Airport during the early morning hours of June 12.

Judd Sanson, 27, of Jamaica Avenue, was ordered held without bail after he was arraigned in Queens Criminal Court on Thursday afternoon on a criminal complaint charging him with multiple counts of weapons possession, unlawful possession of pistol or revolver ammunition, and unlawful use of a police uniform or emblem and other crimes after the arsenal was found in his SUV.

‘Ghost car’ driver arrested in East Elmhurst after traffic stop reveals weapons, threatening note: NYPD

Police from the 110th Precinct in Elmhurst discovered an arsenal of weapons in a ghost car they pulled over on Ditmars Boulevard and 86th Street in East Elmhurst early Wednesday morning.

NYPD Chief of Department Jeffrey Maddrey held a press briefing at the 110th Precinct on Wednesday afternoon to discuss what the sergeant and three officers from the 110th Precinct public safety team found when they pulled over a black Ford Explorer at around 1:30 a.m. because it had blacked-out license plates.

Henry ‘Hank’ Krumholz, stalwart pioneer of Queens LGBTQ Pride, dies at 73

Henry “Hank” Krumholz, a pioneering gay rights activist in Queens, passed away on Sunday in his Flushing apartment at the age of 73.

Krumholz played a crucial role in the establishment and success of the Queens LGBTQ Pride Parade, which is held annually in Jackson Heights. He joined the parade’s sponsoring organization right after its inaugural event in 1993 and continued his involvement for decades. His passing came just a week after this year’s parade on June 2, marking its 31st anniversary.