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Nearly 50 Queens Residents Were Killed by Coronavirus Overnight: NYC

People lining up at Elmhurst Hospital for COVID-19 testing

March 28, 2020 By Michael Dorgan

Queens continues to be the borough hardest hit in New York City by the coronavirus, according to data released by the NYC Department of Health this morning.

Since the beginning of the outbreak, there have been 517 deaths in New York City, with 174 of those deaths in the World’s Borough, according to data released at 10 a.m. by the Department of Health. Brooklyn ranks second with 118 fatalities and the Bronx third at 110.

The number of deaths in Queens is skyrocketing, with the death toll up by 49 (from 125 to 174) from 4 p.m. Friday through to this morning. In less than 24 hours, the number of deaths in the borough has jumped by 40 percent.

The death rate in Queens is outpacing the city as a whole. The number across the city increased from 450 at 4 p.m. Friday to 517 this morning, representing about a 15 percent rise.

More residents of Queens have tested positive for COVID-19 than any other borough. As of 10 a.m., 9,228 of the 29,128 New Yorkers– representing 32 percent– who have tested positive live in the borough.

Brooklyn had 7,789 cases, Manhattan 5,036 cases, the Bronx 5,352 cases and Staten Island had 1,718 cases, according to DOH data as of 10 a.m. today.

NYC Department of Health Dept. 10 a.m. March 28

The mayor has yet to release raw data on a neighborhood basis, despite numerous requests from reporters. Anecdotal evidence from an Elmhurst Hospital doctor indicates that many of those hospitalized with COVID-19 live in the immediate area.

Yesterday, the mayor’s office released some data on a per neighborhood basis– with each area denoted by a zone (Queens zones begin with the number 4). The incomplete data did not say how many people in each zone had been tested nor how many people were positive.

The data just showed the percentage of people who tested positive in a given zone. The number could have been based on 5 tests in a zone or 5,000 depending on the area. It also failed to say how many had been tested positive.

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12 Comments

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James

I’m not downplaying the serious and magnitude of this crisis but I honestly think they are lumping in normal deaths that happen on a daily basis along with those that have passed from the coronavirus. We have to remember beside this daily life and death is sadly still going on.

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hUH?

You sound like Trump.

“New York is asking for 40,000 to 30,000 ventilators, but my gut—which, by the way, is full of McDonalds—tells me they don’t actually need that many, and my gut has never been wrong, so I’m not gonna send it to them. Or maybe I will. We’ll see. You’re very rude. Bigly.”

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idiot

what does his comment have to do with trump?…he could be a flaming progressive…go see a psychiatrist for your TDS…

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hUH?

Like Trump, the commentor is ignoring hard evidence and making unsubstantiated claims based on nothing more than their opinion… now go see dr kevorkian for that idiocy of yours…

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John

I work at a hospital. No they are not.
It is that bad.

These people test positive for COVID-19, breathing deteriorates, they get intubated and die from too much fluid in their lungs are a heart attacked.

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Ana

Testing should have started long ago back in December especially because of the amount of people that live and visit the NYC area. All i see is cars on the road and a few people on bikes. Those that the bike lines were put up for got up and left when they could. Thanks Costa for looking out for all the short term residents.

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hUH?

Overlooking your terrible grammar, is now really the time to start a baseless assault on bike lanes? You’re pathetic.

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read carefully

she wasn’t assaulting bike lanes…she was pointing out what a bunch of wimps with no skin in the game the bike lane users are…they get catered to and bail out at the first sign of struggle…fake new yorkers….they should go back to their gated suburbs

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think carefully

Now is not really the time to insult or insinuate any slight against anybody. Everyone everywhere is struggling.

Furthermore, nobody gets a gold-star for sticking around here, and I say that as a third gen native New Yorker.

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Tokester

What wimps …running off to be with their families at a time of global crisis. And in all likelihood, in less densely populated areas of the country too!

You’re right, they should’ve stayed here and burdened our medical system more, just so they could earn that teensy bit of new york streetcred that means SO MUCH now that crime is less than it was in the 1960s.

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Vicky

So sad. Wish i left the city when my sister asked me to. Now she doesn’t want us traveling to stay with her in LI. I am looking at beach rentals.

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