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MTA Plans To Bring W Train Back This Fall

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Feb. 22, 2016 Staff Report

The MTA has announced that it plans to bring back the W train to Astoria this fall, ahead of the Second Avenue Subway’s opening.

W service would operate locally from Astoria-Ditmars Blvd into Manhattan, terminating at Whitehall Street, effectively replacing the Q train in Queens, the MTA said.

This change will allow the Q to be diverted to the Upper East Side, serving the Second Avenue Subway between 63rd and 96th Streets when it opens – which the agency said would be “later this year.”

N train service would remain the same in Queens and Brooklyn, but would run express from 34th Street-Herald Square to Canal Street in Manhattan. There would be no change to R train service.

According to the MTA, benefits for Astoria riders will include unchanged service frequency and an increase in choices for express and local service in Manhattan.

The W train will not run on weekends or late nights.

W service was eliminated in 2010 to cut costs due to decreased MTA funding during the Recession, the agency said.

The MTA estimates that the costs for these service changes is $13.7 million annually, and stated that this figure has been incorporated into its approved budget.

The agency also said it aims to hold a public hearing on W train restoration in the spring.

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Pedro Valdez Rivera Jr.

Let’s be realistic and serious – The MTA 2015-2019 Capital Plan was not approved by the Capital Program Review Board for the following reasons, in which the MTA still needs $7.3B for their program that was unfunded: 1) The MOVE NY Fair Tolling Plan and other forms of congestion pricing in NYC are out of the question because many elected officials and their constituents in the outer boroughs are firmly opposed these, due to the fact that some people have no other transportation options except driving a motorized vehicle point a to point b and they are the part of the working class; 2) The need for increased taxes in the MTA region are out of the question because both Governor Andrew Cuomo and the Republican Led State Senate are firmly opposed these; 3) The need for kicking the can down the road or playing political football by putting is now out of the question because remember, by June 30 of this year, the MTA are running out of their own money for not only this capital plan, but for billions upon billions of dollars in deferred maintenance via the state of good repair; 4) Borrow the $7.3B via bonds, which could lead to 7.3% fare and toll hikes on the top of the biennial 4% fare and toll hikes for bridges, tunnels, subways, buses and commuter rail; 5) A major dispute between Upstate New York, where they needed $22B for road and bridge maintenance, and Downstate New York, where they need $7.3B for mass transit maintenance; and 6) It is not only either a local, city, or state issue, but also a national issue – look at what’s going on in Boston, Philadelphia, Washington D.C. (with the Metro once was shutting down for a day), Atlanta, Chicago, San Francisco (with BART was suffering major delays), and Los Angeles, where dozens upon billions of dollars in deferred maintenance are needed to be funded. Disclaimer: I am a Riders Alliance Member who is with many of my brethren during the MTA Board Meeting on that day. Note: Before you criticize me, take yourself in the mirror and ask yourself: Is NYC will have a next fiscal crisis because of this? And don’t mention about fare evasion by the riders or the taxpayers who are footed the bill for this: That is the least of our problems. Disclaimer: Keep in mind that the MTA Chairman and CEO had said that they are taking this seriously as a long term project. The reasons: 1) According to the most recent U.S. Census in 2014, over 8.6 Million people are living in the 5 Boroughs, with the highest is in Queens, with a 5% increase; 2) Therefore, the more people coming in to a city, the more need for better public transportation in the short-term, the median term, and the long-term; and 3) Even the State Comptroller and now the NYC DOT Commissioner, who is also a Board Member of the MTA had said that this project is a big deal. As a peacemaker, let’s come to a major consensus between your Queen Public Transit Committee, as well as my Riders Alliance and their allies, such as the Straphangers Campaign and the Tri-State Transportation Campaign. Let’s bury the hatchet. BTW, the City of New Still owns it: It is the step in the right direction. However: The biggest obstacle is Governor Cuomo, and we all have a grunge on him, being a person who loves driving, even though he was born and raised in your home Borough in Queens. So Phil, I will put you, Allen Rosen, and all of your members of the Queens Public Transit Committee to look at the mirror and ask yourself: If you want the Rockaway Beach Branch to be reactivated for transit use, are you going after: 1) Governor Cuomo; 2) The State Legislature; 3) The Trust for Public Land; 4) The NYC DOT; or 5) Other Transportation Advocates such as the Riders Alliance. And don’t blame on me: I I am just a “Rogue,” Freelance Reporter. Also, one other thing: you can check out the video made by the same transit advocacy group that I am a member of, the Riders Alliance: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H-wa7swrx2c. Or go to Twitter using #CuomosMTA. To the commenters of this blog, after watching this video, then look at the mirror and ask yourself: Is this the time that we fighting for all citizens? Finally, in terms of the MOVE NY Plan, I know that there is a likelihood that it will pass through the Republican Led State Senate and the Governor in the short term. Unless there is a major domino effect: 1) The deadline for finding a reasonable, source of general funding for the MTA 2015-2019 Capital Plan is due on April 1, where the state budget is due; 2) The MTA Chairman and CEO had warned that the MTA will be running out of money for capital projects after June 30 of this year, so kicking the can down the road is out of the question realistically; 3) If this happens, then the subway, bus and commuter rail systems in the MTA region will be deteriorating to the gory days of the 1970s and the 1980s; 4) The fiscal crisis will be starting to loom, which could result in the decline in the NYC economy; 5) Although the most recent U.S. Census had said that there are over 8.6 million people living in NYC, I will assume that some people will be moving out to the suburbs or in another state; 6) Who is the blame for all of this? Governor Andrew Cuomo because he make all the final decisions towards the MTA; 7) Who will pay for all of this despite that there is tens of billions of dollars in deferred maintenance? My millennial generation as well future generations, since I am a 24 year old recent college graduate. This is the dire reality we are facing right now and realistically: The MOVE NY plan will have a chance to go through at the most perfect timing possible.

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L Jenn

Astoria to downtown workers are mostly benefitted by this change. I will be very happy to not transfer to the R when heading downtown.

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