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Monserrate Seeks Public Office Once Again With City Council Bid

Hiram Monserrate (Facebook)

Jan. 12, 2021 By Allie Griffin

The twice convicted and disgraced politician Hiram Monserrate is once again trying to make a comeback to public office.

The former State Senator and Council Member — who was convicted of misdemeanor assault in 2009 and for the misuse of taxpayer money in 2012 — has filed to challenge Council Member Francisco Moya for the 21st Council district seat, which covers East Elmhurst, Elmhurst, Jackson Heights and Corona.

Monserrate’s filing with the NYC Campaign Finance Board was first reported by the Queens Eagle.

In 2010, Monserrate was expelled from the State Senate after he was found guilty of misdemeanor assault. According to the charges, on Dec. 19, 2008 he slashed his girlfriend’s face with broken glass  before dragging her through the lobby his Jackson Heights apartment building.

Two years later, Monserrate pleaded guilty for misusing more than $100,000 in taxpayer money while he was a city council member in 2006 and 2007. He was sentenced to two years in prison and ordered to pay back the money.

The Democrat has repeatedly tried to get back into public off office despite his convictions.

Most recently, he failed to unseat incumbent Jeffrion Aubry for the 35th Assembly district in 2020. He also ran and lost against Council Member Moya in 2017.

In the upcoming council race, Monserrate faces Moya, as well as challengers Ingrid Gomez and Talea Wufka.

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