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Korean restaurant opens on Broadway

mojka1

Jan. 20, 2015 By Michael Florio

A Korean restaurant has opened on Broadway by an owner who claims that there is a lack of Korean offerings in the neighborhood.

Mokja Korean Eatery, located at 35-19 Broadway, opening its doors Saturday—with the owner believing the restaurant will fill a void given the lack of Korean cuisine in the neighborhood.

The restaurant will be the second owned by Jae Chung, who also owns Korean Express, located at 807 Lexington Avenue.

He said he surveyed several neighborhoods for his second restaurant and discovered that Astoria doesn’t offer residents too many Korean options.

“Astoria is a very trendy neighborhood, yet there aren’t many Korean restaurants,” Chung said.

The restaurant will offer barbeque dishes, fried chicken, stews, soups and noodle dishes. There will also be a variety of Korean rice dishes. (see menu)

The restaurant can seat about 60 people and is open from 11 am to 11 pm, seven days a week. The restaurant is also offering delivery (718-721-0654) and take out, with a delivery minimum of $15. The take out/delivery menu also offers American fare such as burgers, salads and sandwiches.

“There is a lot of interest from people in the community in our restaurant,” Chung said.

“If people like us, I think we will do great.”

The location was previously a 1-800-Flowers.

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James

Mike I would like to see how you feel when you wake up one day and are totally surrounded by Koreans to the point you feel you are in Korea and not welcomed. The strange looks you get when entering a store. Can’t read the menu because it’s not in English. Go to Bayside/ Flushing and see for yourself. I’ve been there. I know how these people get loans from Korea before they even live here and open up a business while we Americans have it hard.

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Mike

If Koreans “take over” and ignorant people like you move away, I’m all for it. Such an inferior way that you’re thinking. No class.

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James

And for good reason. Once Koreans smell an opportunity they will begin to take over the whole neighborhood. Look what they did with Flushing/ Bayside. Lots of shops have signs only in Korean not in English.It’s all Korean people now. The took over. if you are white or any other race they look at you like you are inferior.

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