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DOT to install “neighborhood slow zone”

Astoria Slow Zone

June 18, 2015 By Jackie Strawbridge

The Department of Transportation will soon be constructing a slow zone that will cover a large section of Astoria.

Community Board 1 gave the plan its blessing Tuesday when it voted to approved the zone that will be bounded by Steinway Street to 21st Street and 30th Avenue to Astoria Boulevard.

The speed limit inside the zone will be 20 mph.

The limit on the boundary streets will remain unchanged at 25 mph, according to the DOT.

The agency will also install 14 speed bumps throughout the new slow zone. The entry points to the zone will be marked by large blue 20 mph signs.

slowzone-250In a letter to CB 1 prior to its vote, Councilman Costa Constantinides said that he has heard numerous constituent complaints regarding speeding or dangerous driving within the confines of the recommended slow zone area.

“I believe that the proposed slow zone will be of great benefit to the health and safety of our neighborhood,” Constantinides wrote. “Families living along these streets deserve peace of mind.”

The Department of Transportation claims that the slow zones help reduce injuries and deaths. Its studies indicate that a pedestrian hit at 40 mph only has a 30% chance of surviving, while one hit at 20 mph has a 95% chance of surviving.

A DOT spokesperson said that the slow zone is expected to be implemented in late summer.

email the author: news@queenspost.com

3 Comments

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James

With the current gridlock and unskilled drivers causing traffic and double-parking in the area, this won’t make a difference. More reason to stay out of this vehicle trap region now that slow moving traffic will be law.

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Astorian4Life

This is great and SO NEEDED north where trucks speed along side streets between Ditmars Blvd. and 19th Ave. we have lots of children who narrowly escape being hit by speedings cars and trucks.

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