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Demolition permit issued to raze 1870s Astoria house

July 13, 2017 By Jason Cohen

A house that was built in the 1870s that Astoria historians have been fighting to preserve took another step closer to the wrecking ball yesterday.

A demolition permit was issued by the Department of Buildings yesterday to local developer George Hrisikopoulos giving him the all clear to raze the 31-07 31st Avenue house.

Historians tried to save the house that was once the home of the noted 19th Century musician Ferdinand Quentin Dulcken– when they were informed in March that Hrisikopoulos had filed plans to construct a six-story, 10-unit building on the site, with space for an eating and drinking establishment.

Historians sought to landmark the house but their application was denied by the Landmarks Preservation Commission. The LPC, in rendering its decision, noted that there have been too many alterations over the years to the house.

Bob Singleton, executive director of the Greater Astoria Historical Society, was among those who tried to save the house.

Singleton said today that he is disappointed the house will be destroyed. He said his only request at this point is that Hrisikopoulos allow a professional photographer to take pictures of the interior of the house for historical records.

Hrisikopoulos could not be reached for comment.

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20 Comments

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FireStarMars

The quaint charm of Astoria has been lsadly lost to high rise developers. It all started with Ciitbank and that skyscraper… and now these ugly, behemoth, overpriced condo/coop buldings have mushroomed throughout the waterfront. Born and raised in Astoria, by the waterfront, and now living in Brooklyn … where the same monstrosities are being erected there too.

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Nectarios

Hipsters want to change history take away our history our gun rights and freedom of speech and
Religion. We should evict them like chemo does to cancer

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Don

Good old Department of Buildings They don’t care what goes up as long as they get their money (if not a bribe). Too many new buildings going up and taking away the history of Astoria. They are not accommodating for other resources like parking, transportation and just keeping the neighborhood in tack. Everyone is all for the money. They should be forced to add parking or not build.

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Anonymous

Let me guess- Mr. George Hrisikopoulos never heard about historical landmarks and yet plans to make it that tall so he and his greedy friends can enjoy a nice rooftop scenario every easter and Thanksgiving?

Sorry, not interested. You might as well raze Alba’s Pizza and make that a Two Brothers joint after all…

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Jim

I think the single window in the middle of porch pretty much was the nail in the coffin for this house.

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Jim

As much as I’d like to see the historic buildings of the area saved, this building has been modified so many times that it has long lost its charm. And ti restore it to its former glory would be an expensive, and economically unsound, idea.

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Anonymous

don’t you all worry my friends your counsel person is getting alot of money for this rest assure –

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Bernie Goetz

Yup! 10 units and the idiot that runs this city will require no garage. Just more bike lanes so we can resemble the streets of Hong Kong.

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Anonymous

I heard they are planning on painting bike lanes on the roofs of every car in the neighborhood.

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Daniel.

When are they going to build more schools and add another hospital. It’s insane the amount of people being added to the neighborhood and no resources for the people that live here.

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Jay

Schools and hospitals don’t just get built. They need funding and to be staffed adequately. I agree that Astoria and Long Island City need more schools and another hospital, but it’s just not that simple.

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gouge

More than 4.5 million tourists sailed to Lady Liberty and Ellis Island last year which is the highest number of visitors the landmarks have ever seen. In other words, its a lot of revenue for the city. If this was not the case who knows what they would try to put on that island.

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anon

Obviously the comparison between an old dump that has been modified multiple times and the Statue of Liberty is clear. To be against a large building is perfectly reasonable but pretending this old shack is historic is a stretch.

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Out with the old in with the new

Save what house? The house is close to 150yrs old. Why are these nosey people trying to stop the guy from making money. Historic my butt. It’s old and the new multi use building serves the neighborhood much better

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Julia

Bitter nasty comment clearly not someone who cares about America’s history. Go away!

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