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De Blasio Calls for Rent Freeze for 2.3 Million New Yorkers

Mayor Bill de Blasio at the press conference Sunday

March 30, 2020, By Michael Dorgan

Mayor Bill de Blasio has called for a rent freeze for over two million New Yorkers to help them get through the coronavirus pandemic.

The freeze would apply to the 2.3 million people living in the city’s one million rent-stabilized units.

Many residents have suffered economic hardship under the coronavirus as local businesses were forced to shut in an attempt to stop the virus from spreading.

De Blasio said the city will work with the state to suspend the Rent Guidelines Board process for the remainder of the year meaning tenants will not see any increase in their rent.

“We are in the midst of a crisis only comparable to the Great Depression,” de Blasio said Friday.

“The people of our city are struggling and a rent freeze is the lifeline so many will need this year to stay above water,” he said.

Governor Cuomo has already ordered a 90-day moratorium on commercial and residential evictions but some local leaders believe more needs to be done to protect residents during the crisis.

Earlier this week, State Senator Mike Gianaris unveiled legislation that would suspend rent for 90 days for tenants who have lost their jobs or had to close their business due to the virus.

On Saturday, U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders endorsed Gianaris’ plan.

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Smith

It means that if you are a rent stabilized tenant and your lease is about to expire/renew, there will not be a rent increase right now with the lease renewal. The rent amount will stay the same or “frozen” until further notice. Tenants are still obligated to pay their rent; that does not change.

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Smith

The majority of NYC landlords are small family landlords. Especially the smaller Rent Stabilized buildings that dot the NYC landscape. The campaign “We House NY” is literally just that. We, small landlords, house the majority of New York City residents. If they condone bagging the family landlords on rent payments, who literally house the majority of NYC and rent stabilized tenants, then what? How do you expect to live in that apt building? How do you expect it to run? We have debts & services to pay, mortgages, property taxes, water bills, repairs, maintenance, employees….DiBlasio is one of the biggest blights in NYC history. He is also a landlord with NO RENT STABILIZED UNITS. One again, his rules, and the rules in general, do not apply to him. God bless America and God bless NYC. I hope you are all doing well and staying healthy.

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The majority landlords are soulless elites like Trump

Does Trump strike you as a “small family landlord?” Because the VAST majority of NYC real estate is owned by giant corporations, like The Trump Organization.

Him and his ilk are exactly who’s hurting the middle class in the middle of a pandemic. Who cares? He can just move to his golden tower with his name on it.

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Vincint

So many sketchy characters walking the neighborhood. Be careful especially with everything being closed and no reason for them to be here other than shopping near business areas. And call 311 if you see large gatherings. Too many house parties are occurring. One was on a roof this past week with male guests screaming at pedestrians and screaming at each other to show private parts. It sounded like a large drunk gay fraternity.

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joe

most smaller buildings in NYC (especially the boroughs) are small businesses and owned by families. If you suspend all of their income, you also have to suspend all of their expenses. That includes property taxes, mortgages, water bill, con ed, fuel costs, insurance costs, … and that still doesn’t include maintenance needed.

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Ari

Close all the city parks and playgrounds already! I live by Astoria Park and feel nervous to leave my house to shop for food with the amount of people on the street! Makes no sense when you advise people to stay home to leave them open.

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