You are reading

Cyclists Hold Rally on Queensboro Bridge, Demand That Car Lane be Converted Into Pedestrian Pathway

State Sen. Michael Gianaris one of several speakers at a rally Sunday demanding that a car lane on the Queensboro Bridge be converted to a pedestrian pathway (Sen. Michael Gianaris via Twitter)

Sept. 28, 2020 By Allie Griffin

Cyclists and pedestrians took over the south outer roadway of the Queensboro Bridge Sunday to demand that it be converted from a car lane into a pedestrian pathway.

Bike advocates and several elected officials are calling on the Department of Transportation (DOT) to convert the lane into a pedestrian-only pathway and make the current shared pedestrian and cyclist pathway on the north outer roadway into a bicycle-only path.

Transportation advocacy groups — such as Transportation Alternatives and Bike New York — have been calling for the changes for years, but a recent uptick in bicycle use across New York City during the pandemic has made their demands more urgent.

They say the current pathway is too narrow to be safely shared by pedestrians and cyclists–who walk and bike in both directions.

Several elected officials joined bike advocates at the rally Sunday, including City Council Members Ben Kallos and Jimmy Van Bramer, State Sens. Mike Gianaris and Jessica Ramos and Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer.

“More people are cycling than ever before,” Ramos said at the rally. “That means that our streets and our bridges need to keep us safe with the infrastructure that is necessary to keep us safe. The same way that streets are for people and not cars, bridges are for people.”

Kallos and Van Bramer, who both represent districts that flank the Queensboro Bridge, have even pledged discretionary funds to support the roadway conversion along the bridge.

The DOT is in favor of converting the south outer roadway, but a department spokesperson said it cannot be done as soon as the rally-goers would like.

The department must complete major safety upgrades and repairs to the bridge before it can convert the roadway from vehicle usage to pedestrian usage, according to the spokesperson.

“We couldn’t agree more: adding bike and pedestrian capacity to our bridges is a great idea,” the spokesperson said. “We’re completing urgent safety upgrades to the Queensboro Bridge, a 100+ year old structure, and we need extra lane capacity to get it done.”

The repairs aren’t expected to be completed until 2022 and the city’s budget crisis due to the coronavirus shutdowns adds another obstacle to the lane conversion project.

“We also have to evaluate every project in the context of our historic budget crisis,” the DOT spokesperson said. “But conversations are ongoing on moving this project forward, and we’re grateful for the community’s enthusiasm for it.”

email the author: [email protected]

4 Comments

Click for Comments 
Pat Macnamaracist why are you criticizing Trump?

We have the worst unemployment in our nation’s history, and it’s hitting NYC hard. But hey, the game show host is trying!

9
7
Reply
Jimmy C

Nothing more useless than the “democratic socialists” in Astoria. Our neighborhood is falling apart, high crime, shootings, filth all over, and all this clown Gianaris is worried about is getting a pedestrian pathway on the bridge. Clueless Costa and his green gardens, Gianaris and his pathways, and super clown AOC and her Vanity fair cover. Useless idiots in charge.

The spoonfaced liberals from out of state will soon elect Caban to finish the job on us native Astorians.

29
3
Reply

Leave a Comment
Reply to this Comment

All comments are subject to moderation before being posted.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Recent News

Op-Ed: This Year’s State Budget Must Prioritize Climate, Jobs, and Justice for New York

Op-Ed, Jan. 30, By Assemblymember Jessica González-Rojas

In a time of rampant economic inequality and environmental injustice, it is easy to feel defeated.  Here in Queens and across New York State, however, communities are organizing for a better future. New Yorkers from different backgrounds and with different lived experiences are proving that we can build community, organize, and create a future that reflects our shared values.