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Cuomo Says Schools Can Hold in-Person Classes With Conditions This Fall

Governor Andrew Cuomo (Mike Groll_Office of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo)

Aug. 7, 2020 By Michael Dorgan 

Governor Andrew Cuomo has announced that all schools across the state are permitted to re-open in the fall for in-person classes.

The governor gave the go-ahead after recognizing that all 10 regions across the state had met the requirements he set before schools were permitted to reopen in September.

In July, Cuomo said that schools would only be allowed to reopen in regions where the percentage of COVID-19 tests coming back positive was significantly below 5 percent.

All 10 regions across the state had met that requirement as of Friday, with the state average currently around 1 percent, he said.

The governor said that school districts would still need to get their reopening plans approved by the New York State Department of Health and the New York State Education Department before being permitted to hold in-person classes.

Cuomo warned that if the infection rate went above 5 percent he would review his decision.

However, Cuomo said he was optimistic that New Yorkers would work together to keep the rate down.

“If anybody can open schools, we can open schools,” the governor said at a press briefing Friday.

“We’ve kept that infection rate down, and we can bring the same level of intelligence to the school reopening that we brought to the economic reopening,” Cuomo said.

Mayor Bill de Blasio, who has clashed with the governor on school issues throughout the pandemic, has not given the all-clear for New York City schools to reopen. However, they are on track to reopen in September, based on his standards.

De Blasio said Friday that city schools would be permitted to reopen as long as the percentage of positive tests was below 3 percent and that students and adults wore masks or face coverings. The percentage of positive COVID-19 cases in New York City stood at around 1 percent this week, according to state data.

Cuomo said that it would be up to school districts to decide on the layout of classes and they would need to get their plans approved by the state Department of Education.

The city announced last week that is planning to open on a hybrid model in which children attend in-person classes for one to three days per week and learn online for the rest of the time.

Cuomo said that parents and teachers must be involved in the reopening process and it is imperative that they feel safe and secure before returning to school.

“I have been deluged with calls from parents and teachers, and there’s a significant level of anxiety and concern,” he said.

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7 Comments

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Daniel

Although the DOE talks about classroom safety protocols
what about the students
who must take public mass transit to get to and from school?
Our transit system was hit hard by COVID -19, and with the looming budget crises cash our strapped transit system will have to cut services.
This will surely impact
students who rely on
mass transit for their
school commutes.
My son told me that he feels that, at least for now he does not feel safe so we opted for
at home remote learning
with the option to switch to
in classroom learning in acknowledging that at this time
our school’s learning schedule
is that he will have only
5 days out of 15 school days
in school only.
So in light of this my son would
be mostly learning from home anyways. His in classroom time may not consist of full days
but we still have NOT been sent a full plan of action from
his school 119 Glendale.

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Bill

Here’s the problem… Cuomo wants to run for president in 2024. That means he needs to prove to others that he has handled the virus better than anyone else. That, in turn, means that he will need to prove his decision to open schools was the correct one.

Now the problem… to do that he may have to play with the numbers as other governors have already done (e.g. Florida).

Bottom line: Can we Trust Cuomo when the lives of our students and teachers are at stake?

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Bill’s brother

Here is the problem Bill. It’s people like you who drag politics into every conversation.

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Dean K

Running for president says WHO? He never said he would run and quickly shot down the idea when asked about it.

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Antonio

He doesn’t need to prove that he already did proved this. NY was the hotspot and epicenter of the pandemic throughout the country. Cuomo was not political in any of his decisions on combating the virus and has run this city based out of data and science unlike Trump which bases all his decisions how it makes him look and his party. Trump told people to not worry about the virus and it will magically disappear. Yeah 160,000 Americans disappeared alright. At his rallies he removed social distancing stickers from seats and never encouraged people to wear masks.

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