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Astoria civic group and City Planning aim to increase parking

14thstreet

Oct. 12, 2016 By Hannah Wulkan

Finding street parking may become a bit easier in Astoria.

The Old Astoria Neighborhood Association, a local civic group, commissioned a study to examine the possibility of adding nearly 100 angled parking spaces to specific parts of the neighborhood to increase the total number of spots available.

Along with the Transportation Division of the Department of City Planning, OANA narrowed in on two specific locations to add parking, on Hoyt Avenue South from 21st Street eastbound, and on 14th Street between 30th Avenue and Broadway.

The proposal would add 60-degree angled parking to each stretch of road. It would add about 45 spaces to Hoyt Avenue, and about 47 spaces to 14th Street, eliminating parallel parking on those stretches of road.

The new spaces would be reverse parking, meaning cars would back in to the spaces, making it easier to pull out in to traffic safely upon leaving the space.

OANA and City Planning conducted a drive through of the neighborhood in July, eventually targeting six streets they thought would work for angled parking. After further examination, the number of possible streets was narrowed down to two.

The plan is still in its early stages, and it has to go through several steps before approval. OANA and City Planning are working to finalize a proposal, and will then take it to the Department of Transportation for approval. It will also need to go through Community Board 1.

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