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Astoria Boulevard Station Reopens Amid Continuing Work

The new Astoria Boulevard station (Sen. Michael Gianaris Twitter)

Dec. 19, 2019 By Allie Griffin

The Astoria Boulevard N/W subway station reopened to customers last night, while construction crews continue work to make it ADA accessible.

After nine months of closure, the station reopened with a new mezzanine and greater vertical clearance to prevent trucks traveling beneath its overpass from striking the station structure. The former mezzanine was demolished and completely rebuilt.

Construction crews will continue work to add four new elevators and other accessibility features, while the station is in use. The full project is expected to be completed in the fall of next year.

The new Astoria Boulevard station (Sen. Michael Gianaris Twitter)

Since the station’s March closure, workers also strengthened the station’s column foundations, built four new mezzanine-to-platform staircases, rehabilitated platforms and installed new LED lighting and canopy roofs. Artists also beautified that station with new glass art both inside the mezzanine and on staircases.

“Last night, trains officially began to stop at Astoria Boulevard again,” Council Member Costa Constantinides said in a statement. “This has been a long few months for a lot of us who use this station, but I’m glad to see the authority kept to its word on finishing this December.”

When the full Astoria Boulevard station upgrades are completed, the station will have two street-to-mezzanine elevators and two mezzanine-to-platform elevators, as well as rebuilt elevated walkways, new benches, finished platform stair enclosures, new digital service information signage and a pair of new street-to-mezzanine staircases.

A rendering of elevators at the new Astoria Boulevard station (NYCT)

The ADA upgrades are part of the MTA plan to make all its subways more accessible. Under its 2020-2024 capital plant, New York City Transit will spent $5 billion to increase accessibility at an additional 70 stations.

The MTA has come under fire in the past for not including accessibility upgrades like elevators in station renovations.

“Our community will continue to hold [the MTA] accountable, however, to ensure the elevators are installed on time,” Constantinides added. “Astoria has been an accessibility desert for too long, and we won’t stop fighting until every station in western Queens can be used by everyone.”

NYC Transit has been repairing and rehabilitating the entire elevated Astoria N/W line since 2017 — repairing both its tracks and station interiors. More information, including work site hours and upcoming service changes, can be found here.

“Our customers were absolutely thrilled to return to this station last night and I’m thrilled for them,” said Andy Byford, New York City Transit President. “I’m proud of the team that delivered this complicated phase of the project safely, on time and on budget, and excited for when we finish the job with complete accessibility at the station.”

“Our commitment to upgrading the infrastructure throughout this area of Queens is a huge win for local residents and will vastly improve the customer experience,” Byford added.

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19 Comments

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Astoria raised

While the beautification of stations is a complete waste of money having fully accessible stations is a must. Choose a location and try getting there by only using ADA stops and you’ll see how difficult it is for people using wheelchairs to get around. Oh yea and let’s not mention what might happen if a train bypasses one of the many wheelchair accessible stops and what that will do to your commute.
Just because installing elevators doesn’t benefit you doesn’t mean it is a waste of money. There is a greater purpose way beyond you being inconvenienced for a short period of your lives. Get a grip and learn some empathy

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jenastoriat

Great job! Thanks to the MTA workers! Glad to see the station reopened and looking forward to seeing all the updates, especially the badly needed elevators.

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Improve on delays not appearance!

Looks pretty ugly. Not sure what took them all of this time as there don’t seem to be any drastic improvements to the portion that’s already open. . The colors are awful, the stairs looking like they are 10 years old already. Station looks like it was modified in the 1970’s.

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WeJustPayForIt

Friends of and contributors to A. Cuomo & Family are a few million richer this Christmas. Subway riders will be absolutely elated about having a square of fresh concrete to stand on for the 6 minutes they wait for a train.
Well, that’s not 100% true. During weekday rush hours with both N and W running it’s 3 minutes.

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rikki

tens of millions wasted for the 5 people a day who are in wheelchairs….geez give them free cab rides for life…

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Sick of No Common Sense

That station is also used by people going to the airport. I’ve encountered numerous times where commuters are held up because travelers are carrying suitcases down.

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JF

How about all those slow movers blocking the stairways? Old people, injured, weak, children, strollers.

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Gottago Wee

But at least 10 people a day, if not more, will be able to use them as public restrooms…Can’t wait for that scrumptious aroma when the sun beats down on those glass elevators on a hot sunny day!!

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BronxSteve

You have no clue. Elevators are also used by – people with strollers, people with heavy packages, people with walking or climbing problems (bad legs) who do not use wheelchairs, very tired people after a long day’s work, etc.

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Empathy

The problem is not having elevators or not. It’s the time and the cost it takes. People need elevators.

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Astoria Bred

While the beautification of stations is a complete waste of money, having fully accessible stations is a must. Choose a location in New York City and try reaching your destination by only using ADA stops and you’ll experience the difficulties people using wheelchairs encounter in their daily lives. Oh yes, and lets not mention what might happen if a train bypasses one of the “many” wheelchair accessible stops and how that might affect your commute. Just because installing elevators doesn’t benefit YOU doesn’t mean it is a complete waste of money. There is a greater purpose way beyond you being inconvenienced for a short period of your life by having to walk an extra 5 minutes to either 30th avenue or Ditmars to catch the train. Get a grip and learn some empathy.

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Freezing

They build a whole new subway line in China in 2 years.. We will build 2 ADA elevators. And yeah.. We also have to catch fare beaters..

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