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Another Large Apartment Building Planned For Astoria Waterfront

Astoria plan

Aug. 5, 2015 By Jackie Strawbridge

After nabbing a sprawling Hallets Cove property last year, an Astoria developer has filed plans to build a 6-story, 142-unit apartment building on the site.

Slated for 11-02 30th Drive, the planned building will neighbor the sites of the incoming Hallets Point and Astoria Cove megaprojects that will add thousands of apartments to the neighborhood. It is also a short distance from the future dock of a planned Astoria ferry.

Shibber Khan of the Criterion Group purchased the nearly 120,000 square-foot lot for $57 million last October, Crains reported at the time.

Not many amenities are listed for the apartment building, according to the filing, aside from a courtyard and ground floor “community space.”

Parking for 46 cars will occupy the cellar, falling short of zoning regulations, which require spaces for half of the dwelling units, or 71 spots. Meanwhile, there are 71 bike parking spaces planned.

Khan did not respond for comment.

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Garga

What’s the point of zoning regulations if this building will be in violation? Where is the enforcement?

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Anonymous visitor

As a neighbor to the 1 story factory that’s currently there, I welcome the extra foot traffic and lighting that a new bldg will bring. The current structures just covered with graffiti, and dark and desolate. More folks around here will hopefully bring some stores, coffee shops, etc. This side of astoria is more industrial and can use the foot traffic. Just an opinion

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