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Another ‘Affordable’ Housing Lottery Opens in Long Island City, 1 Bedrooms Go for $2,345

(NYC HPD)

Oct. 2, 2020 By Michael Dorgan

More than three dozen “affordable” apartments in a newly constructed building in Long Island City are up for grabs through the city’s affordable housing lottery.

The building, called “The Cove,” is located at 43-12 Hunter St. and 37 “affordable” housing units are available for those who earn at least $68,000 a year.

The Cove, developed by Rockrose, is 18 stories and consist of 123 units, with 86 being market rate.

Applications for the “affordable” units are now open and applicants are required to apply on the NYC Housing Connect website. The lottery is open until Dec. 4.

There is a mix of studio, one-bedroom and two-bedroom “affordable” units on offer.

There are 19 studio apartments available for $1,990 a month to households of one or two people who earn between $68,229 and $118,300 combined annually.

Additionally, there are 13 one-bedroom units on offer for $2,345 a month to households of one to three people who make between $80,400 and $133,120 combined annually.

Five two-bedroom units are available for $3,072 a month to households of two to five people who make between $105,326 and $159,640 combined annually.

A breakdown of the full income requirements is below. The lottery does not provide a preference–or a set aside– for residents of Community Board 2, which covers Sunnyside, Woodside and Long Island City.

The complex features a rooftop terrace, a recreation room and a shared laundry room.

Each unit comes with built in-unit washers and dryers and high-end kitchen appliances. There are also bicycle spaces.

There will be retail on the first floor of the building.

The lottery is taking place at the same time that 185 “affordable” units in TF Cornerstone’s Hunters Point South development are on offer.

Applications for that building are open until Nov. 23. Half of the affordable units in that lottery are being set aside for residents of Community Board 2.

(NYC HPD)

(NYC HPD)

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3 Comments

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AstoriaGal

Nice that affordable is in quotes. But again, do you only report this and never question it? Who sets these ‘affordable’ guidelines? What’s the formula used? No one I know is making that kind of money nor can they afford that high a rent. Most people I know are unemployed or, like myself, making a lot less now than pre-pandemic. And most of us were born/raised here. Don’t we have a right to something ‘affordable’ for us?

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Pat Macnamara

And most of us were born/raised here. Don’t we have a right to something ‘affordable’ for us? The short answer is NO. This notion that housing is a right is some figment of your imagination. No one owes you anything. To play the game of life you must actually compete and not sit back waiting for someone to hand you something they worked really hard for. Think about those who didn’t have anything to begin with-how are they surviving now?

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AstoriaGal

The short answer is yes, that people have a right to make a life in the area where they were born and raised. Get real. Most people cannot afford rents over $2000 a month. What about the people working hard at jobs that pay maybe $50k or under – they should have to leave the place they know and love, leave their families and friends because there’s no affordable housing for their income level? Read your comment again – do you really feel this way?

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